Sunday, February 24, 2008

Asus Eee PC with 1.2Ghz Pentium M


Guryhwa has just swapped his Eee PC cpu to 1.2Ghz Pentium M..

Continue reading..



This is not a easy mod. You would need special tools and skills to do it, so don't try it if you haven't done anything similar before.

hmmm.. There might be some Pentium Eee PCs at Ebay soon...

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9 comments:

Jacob said...

It would be nice to have a little more information than "Soldering is complicated but interesting."

Fadumpt said...

To be fair...if you aren't a rather experienced electronics hobbyist/engineer..."soldering is complicated but interesting" is about as much as you need to know :) Anything more and you have a bricked EEE and angry emails to the "howto writeup person".

most likely the processor was carefully desoldered from the board and the faster processor was soldered in it's place. EEE's use Pentium M's to begin with so it should take much more then that, but that's enough to really screw up your day with a minor mistake or three.

Anonymous said...

you'll need a hot air rework station and some solder paste... and very steady hands. if you don't already know how to do it, this is probably not for you. good to know that it works though!

Anonymous said...

Since when does putting a cpu into a socket require soldering? I'm confused.

Fadumpt said...

anonymous: fair enough...but in this case, as with your average laptop, there isn't a socket....they take up too much space. Here you have directly soldered chip to board...those pins on the processor are completely soldered to the motherboard in the places where they would normal be just locked into place with the lever mechanism.

Binding Designs, LLC said...

That does not sound like it would cause any damage as long as you are careful. Just make sure it does not interfere with the electrical.

Fadumpt said...

only you are working with the electrically...think hundreds of pins, most likely, that have to be soldered in such a way so that they contact their corresponding pin but don't short out on another pin...and these pins are tiny. Decent case scenario, you fry the processor you are putting in, worst case, you fry the EEE...depending on how much you paid for the processor, those might be switched

Fadumpt said...

meh...Electrical*

Anonymous said...

Actually, there are no pins so it is harder than that. This is a BGA or Ball Grid Array (not PGA) processor.

I'm not sure, but I think they use some solder paste, heat them at the same time, and push the cpu into place. If you were even able to get it off, you'd be likely to lift off the little pads on the mobo.

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